California Rolls

Ingredients:

  • 4 nori sheets
  • 3 cups (15 oz / 470g) sushi rice
  • 8 teaspoons ocean trout or flying fish roe
  • 1-2 cucumbers, cut into thin, lengthwise slices
  • 8 jumbo shrimp (king prawns), cooked, shelled, veins and tails removed
  • 1-2 avocados, peeled, pitted and sliced
  • 4-8 lettuce leaves, torn or sliced (optional)
Makes 4 rolls (32 pieces)

Thick rolls can be rolled in a variety of ways to make decorative patterns in the rice. Experiment in the way you lay out the ingredients and see the differing patterns that result. It is best to serve rolls immediately they are made as the rice inside expands and the nori tends to split. The rolls will keep for up to half an hour before serving if they are rolled in paper towel and then plastic wrap.

California rolls, as their name suggests, were invented in California, although thick sushi rolls originated in the Osaka area.

1. Lay 1 nori sheet on a rolling mat and put 3/4 cup (4 oz/125g) sushi rice on it. Spread rice over nori sheet, leaving 3/4 inch (2cm) of bare nori at far side and making a small ledge of rice in front of this bare strip.
2. Spoon 2 teaspoons roe along center of rice, using back of a spoon to spread. Add lettuce if desired.
3. Lay 2 shrimp along center, with one-quarter of cucumber strips.
4. Lay one-quarter of avocado slices along center. Add one-quarter of lettuce.
5. Roll mat over once, away from you, pressing ingredients in to keep roll firm, leaving the 3/4-inch (2-cm) strip of nori rice-free.
6. Covering roll (but not rice-free strip of nori), hold rolling mat in position and press all around to make roll firm.
7. Lift up top of rolling mat and turn roll over a little more so that strip of nori on far side joins other edge of nori to seal roll. Use your fingers to make sure roll is properly closed.

8. Roll entire roll once more, and use finger pressure to shape roll in a circle, an oval, or a square.

Using a sharp knife, cut each roll in half, then cut each half in half again. Then cut each quarter in half crosswise to make a total of 8 equal-size pieces. Cut gently to maintain shape.

Recipe source

Reprinted with permission from the book:

Sushi (The Essential Kitchen Series)

by Ryuichi Yoshii

Periplus Editions (HK) Ltd.

With this practical guide, you can make your own sushi at home, using the book's step-by-step instructions and photographs to show you how to make a variety of dishes.

ISBN 962 593 460X

Y2300

Source: Sushi (The Essential Kitchen Series) by Ryuichi Yoshii
(c) Copyright 2001 Lansdowne Publishing Pty Ltd. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

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